3 steps to quickly make a good multivariate test

21 02 2008

Having great testing technology puts a lot of power in your hands. You can test anything and everything you want. However, like any other tool, to use it effectively you have to use it right. There’s a lot of best practices and thought that goes into test design, but following these three rules can get you a good test in most situations.

Steps
  1. Maximize your traffic: Pack as much as you can into a test for the amount of traffic you have to keep it a short test. Using Widemile’s platform that’s 2 weeks to be safe, with Google Optimizer you should do at least a month (explanation).
  2. Test opposites: If you test stuff that’s similar, they’ll perform about the same. So find out the general theme you should be following first by testing opposites (B2B vs B2C, podcast vs ebook, descriptive vs benefits).
  3. Learn from the previous test: Always make sure you line up your tests so that you learn something that can be used in the next one to either refine or to learn something new.

The goal of these three things are to maximize your time spent testing by testing as much as possible while also minimizing testing suboptimal content. For example, if I was selling iPods and I tested 2 images of people running with the iPod, one with a man and the other a woman, I might think that was a good test. However I could have totally missed out on an image that worked better, such as an iPod next to a PC. I could test that out after the initial test, but then I just wasted one test run. The right way would be to test one sport image versus one PC image and find out which direction to go. From there I could test against other opposing images or refine the PC image.

The only warning I’d throw in is that if you’re trying to test a lot of things at once, you might want to scale back. Pick a 2-4 themes depending on your test size and stick to testing them out. Don’t mix and match.

Follow these steps and you’re on your way to getting not quick tests, but efficient ones.





What is Taguchi? How does it relate to testing?

14 02 2008
New URL testingblog.widemile.com
the Taguchi method

Multivariate testing is a buzz word these days, but the buzzword of multivariate testing seems to be Taguchi. However, that term is being abused. Do you know what Taguchi really means? I wasn’t even positive, so to get some background, I did some research and talked with Vladimir (Widemile’s Chief Scientist).

The name and method comes from Genichi Taguchi. His method, also known as Robust Design, attempted to improve product manufacturing quality. Therefore it falls into an area of engineering called Quality Engineering.

Does this sound aligned with website testing? Not really, and this is the problem of using the term Taguchi with web site testing. The goals of manufacturing and the goals of a website are not the same.

What most people are attempting to grasp when using the term Taguchi is fractional factorial test design. (I discussed this at length in my post about the difference between Widemile’s technology and Google Optimizer.) The Taguchi method uses a fractional factorial test design and is under the umbrella of fractional factorial testing but is not the only or best fractional factorial method. In fact, even within manufacturing, the Taguchi method was the inspiration for many new techniques but many statisticians find it flawed.*

It is important to differentiate the Taguchi method from fractional factorial test design since one is a basis for manufacturing while the other is purely related to design of experiments. You need to ensure that the math and science behind your testing is based on methods that have the end goal of optimizing your website only. So if your testing tool uses the Taguchi method for testing, you better ask what that really means.

So does Widemile use Taguchi? We don’t use the Taguchi method, however do use fractional factorial test design. I like to say that our platform goes beyond Taguchi because it was specifically made for optimizing web content.

Don’t get sucked into the Taguchi method, it is just a buzzword used by your fellow marketers. Just because the technology doesn’t use Taguchi, doesn’t mean you should count it out.

*Read more after the jump for Vladimir’s explanation of the Taguchi method and its criticisms
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